Russian spies and shadowy tech glow in ‘Impostor Syndrome’

“There will appear a time when it isn’
t

They

re spying on me as a result of my telephone

anymore. Eventually, it will be

My cellphone is spying on me

.” —Philip K. Dick

We have all heard about Silicon Valley. We know that the tech minds that make our lives easier churn out their most up-to-date concepts in that particular portion of California. But how much do we all seriously know about the operate the cyber-geniuses are conducting to provide us with the most recent and greatest technological progress? Our most current browse can take us into the coronary heart of Silicon Valley, the place just one tech exec is not exactly who she appears to be.

‘Impostor Syndrome’ by Kathy Wang


Julia holds the second most impressive placement at a substantial tech organization known as Tangerine. She’s lauded for becoming 1 of the handful of ladies at the best in Silicon Valley and her public persona is all about breaking the glass ceiling and getting a healthier perform/existence harmony.

Julia’s actuality, nevertheless, is pretty various. Julia is also a spy.

Kathy Wang’s latest novel “Impostor Syndrome” tells the tale of Julia’s ascent to tech royalty as a spy for a Russian firm termed the SPB. Just after several years of residing in Silicon Valley, Julia has develop into accustomed to her lavish American way of life and is additional devoted to keeping her status at Tangerine than she is to furnishing the SPB with whatsoever data they ask for. As Julia begins to press again in opposition to the SPB and her handler Leo, a very low-level personnel named Alice starts to look into some peculiar details figures at the organization…that guide back to Julia’s SPB do the job.

Explained to mostly from Julia, Leo and Alice’s views, Wang weaves an intricate tale of tech drama and cat-and-mouse espionage. Julia wishes to stay in electric power but her loyalties lie with her own ambition rather of Moscow’s, even though Alice’s curiosity is placing Julia’s long run at threat.

“Impostor Syndrome” is a thrilling satire that examines the tradition of huge tech corporations as well as who can and simply cannot accessibility the American Desire. Wang’s novel also plays up the Massive Brother fears many people have about technologies and poses the problem, just how secure and private is your on line lifetime.

From the ebook jacket…

In 2006 Julia Lerner is dwelling in Moscow, a current college graduate in pc science, when she’s recruited by Russia’s biggest intelligence company. By 2018 she’s in Silicon Valley as COO of Tangerine, one of America’s most famed technology providers. In among her govt management (make gives to promising startups, crush them and copy their capabilities if they refuse) self advertising (verify out her most recent op-ed in the WSJ, on Perform/Lifetime Harmony 2.) and function in gender equality (transfer the most aggravating girls from her crew), she funnels intelligence back again to the motherland. But now Russia’s inquiring for more, and Julia’s acquiring anxious.

Alice Lu is a 1st era Chinese American whose moms and dads are delighted she’s doing the job at Tangerine (these a thriving enterprise!). As well bad she’s slogging absent in the lower echelons, recently dumped, and now sharing her high priced two-bedroom condominium with her cousin Cheri, a perennial “founder’s girlfriend”. A single afternoon, while accomplishing a server check out, Alice discovers some unusual action, and now she’s burdened with two highly effective but distressing suspicions: Tangerine’s privacy configurations aren’t as demanding as the company promises they are, and the man or woman abusing this loophole could be Julia Lerner herself.

The closer Alice gets to Julia, the far more Julia thoughts her personal loyalties. Russia may possibly have put her in the Valley, but she’s the a person who built her career is not she entitled to safeguard the way of life she’s acquired?

If you enjoy…

For viewers who get pleasure from pondering the darker side of technology, the chilling ambition found in Dave Eggers novel “The Circle” may well be just what you’re searching for.

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